CPSR-GLOBAL Digest 79 Topics covered in this issue include: 1) Re (@) Communicating the Emerging Philosophy by jed@llnl.gov (James E. [Jed] Donnelley) (by way of marsha-w@uiuc.edu 2) (@) ANNOUNCING: The Democracy Papers by ODIN (by way of marsha-w@uiuc.edu (Marsha-W)) 3) re Rights Campaign (@) by rkmoore@iol.ie (Richard K. Moore) (by way of marsha-w@uiuc.edu (Marsha-W)) 4) The pricing issue(@) by rkmoore@iol.ie (Richard K. Moore) (by way of marsha-w@uiuc.edu (Marsha-W)) 5) re: pricing issue by rkmoore@iol.ie (Richard K. Moore) (by way of marsha-w@uiuc.edu (Marsha-W)) 6) Re: Rights Campaign by Arun Mehta 7) Re: Rights Campaign by Charles Bell 8) Re (@) Rights Campaign by Charles Bell (by way of marsha-w@uiuc.edu (Marsha-W)) 9) MICROSOFT TESTER DIES TRAGICALLY AT HANDS OF "PAL" (fwd) by rkmoore@iol.ie (Richard K. Moore) 10) Joke (fwd) by rkmoore@iol.ie (Richard K. Moore) 11) Resources on the Web (@) by Devron Moziek (by way of marsha-w@uiuc.edu (Marsha-W)) 12) haves and havenots--a repost (@) by marsha-w@uiuc.edu (Marsha-W) 13) Some Critical Computer Science Groups (fwd) 1/2(@) by marsha-w@uiuc.edu (Marsha-W) 14) Some Critical Computer Science Groups (fwd)2/2 (@) by marsha-w@uiuc.edu (Marsha-W) ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Date: Tue, 31 Jan 1995 09:10:11 -0800 From: jed@llnl.gov (James E. [Jed] Donnelley) (by way of marsha-w@uiuc.edu To: cpsr-glob Subject: Re (@) Communicating the Emerging Philosophy Message-ID: Sender: jed@llnl.gov (James E. [Jed] Donnelley) >Thus far, however, the common man and women of the United States have been >virtually locked out of the design... There are an awful lot of perhaps not quite so common men and women in the United States that are building this Information Age - look at the hundreds of Internet Service Providers, thousands of information and/or communication related companies and organizations (e.g. see: http://www-atp.llnl.gov/atp/comp-comm.html the Computer and Communication set of pages - it has extensive cross references to other such lists). >The lords of information and telecommunications oligopoly and monopoly >Capitalism are firmly in control. I strongly disagree with this statement. The carriers presently have a monopoly - government mandated (e.g. as here in Germany, but much less effective). This monopoly is slipping and may soon be gone if present trends continue - allowing many more providers of basic communication capacity into the business - power and rail companies, cable companies, radio facilities, government owners of fiber, etc. >They have corruptly overwhelmed the >judicial branch of government in decisions that allow the Regional Bell >Operating Companies to enter the information services field, despite their >exercise of monopoly power over the communications conduit. I don't know about how they did it - such "corruption" as you argue would not surprise me. However the basic problem is to transition from a time (now) when the RBOCs are granted monopoly control over some aspects of the "communications conduit" to a time when they no longer do. Letting them into the information services field will not allow them to control the content - there are too many other providers and they have too little capability or control in this area. As long as their monopoly is ended they will just be one provider among many (if they even choose to even get into the business). Look at all the "information providers" on the WWW (hello, I am one of them, a pretty ordinary US citizen - there are many thousands if not millions of us). How can you think that anyone can exercise monopoly control over sources of information? It is sincerely ridiculous. >They have bought >influence sufficient to corrupt the legislative process in the U.S. Congress >by cold cash payments of $50 million in "campaign contributions" during the >past decade. This wouldn't at all surprise me - but I am of course ignorant of the details. However, my statements above still apply and I think this makes it even more important to eliminate the government granted monopolies. This is the only way to remove control of such important facilities from the corruptable political process and put it into the market process (e.g. like groceries, clothes, etc.) where consumers are more directly responded to. This transition process is rapidly occuring. I personally (as an information consumer and supplier) think it is wonderful! >At a one-day conference of would-be-cyberspace Robber Barons convened >Jan 11 by Speaker Newt Gingrich's think tank, the Progress and Freedom >Foundation, George Gilder called for sweeping removal of all controls on >telecommunications--such as limits on the mergers of cable and phone >companies. Hurray!! Such controls simply provide more opportunities for corruption and limit the services that I as a consumer am able to buy. >"Where are you on the risks to society that come from highly >centralized private power?...If you dismantle the government, how comfortable >are you with A.T.& T., Microsoft, Bell Atlantic and others deciding what you >watch." [The Nation, Feb 6, 1995]. In my opinion this is simply not a credible threat. How are A.T.& T., Microsoft, Bell Atlantic and others going to restrict what is put on the Internet. The answer is simple - they are not. When you say "government" I assume you are referring to the government monopoly enforced for the carriers and the corresponding control placed on them. >Kapor now wonders why no one had raised >questions of social justice: "You're introducing a new rhetoric for Social >Darwinism." Heather Higgins, a P.F.F. fellow, replied, "Capitalism can never >have a human face," reported David Corn, The Nation's Washington editor. This note puzzles me. The biggest issue that I have heard discussed in this regard is the "Universal Access" notion. This is the buzz word that politicians are using (in my opinion) to keep control - leaving the opportunity that you seem to seek for continued corruption. I don't know how this will come out, but in my opinion if we want to get the most communication into the hands of our poorest, the best way is to forget the notion of "universal access" as a form of control over carriers and to simply give people money (e.g. in the form of a negative income tax) which they can choose to buy information services (or food, transportation, or anything else). Even without more such redistribution of wealth (which I certainly recognise is politically difficult - any time you want to take property from people by government force - naturally they will resist) I believe that the poorest Americans and others will be better served sooner without government attempts to enforce "Universal Access." I admit that this will mean that rural services will end up being more expensive than Urban services. I personally believe this is appropriate as it costs more to deliver rural services. However, I believe the differences will be small enough and the costs of communication wil be driven low enough that this will be no more an issue than it is for gasoline, groceries, or any other products or services that are not presently government regulated. > The amended complaint and supporting >documents include seven counts charging violation of House rules and statute: > 1) Gingrich's political committee (GOPAC) and related entities used >official resources; > 2) ... Sigh. If we can finally get government control out of this industry I believe that we will have fewer opportunities for such corrupting influences (regardless of which side of the isle it is on). Power corrupts - what else can be said. At least marketing power is only provided by the voluntary purchases of consumers - not by corporate purchases of politicians. I find it interesting that you are commenting on U.S. politics and U.S. information marketing developments from Wexford, Ireland. Do you feel that you are adequately connected to the developing information infrastructure to accurately take it's pulse? Can you look at the comp-comm.html page below and check out it's hundreds of cross references? Truely, the cat is out of the bag. In my opinion it is too late for any company, set of companies, or possibly even governments (?) to control information content at this point - certainly in the U.S. anyway. James E. (Jed) Donnelley - http://www-atp.llnl.gov/atp/jed.html Advanced Telecom. Prog. - http://www-atp.llnl.gov/atp/atp.html LAWRENCE LIVERMORE LAB. - http://www.llnl.gov/ Until 4/95 at Uni-Stuttgart - http://www.uni-stuttgart.de/ ------------------------------ Date: Tue, 31 Jan 1995 09:10:19 -0800 From: ODIN (by way of marsha-w@uiuc.edu (Marsha-W)) To: cpsr-glob Subject: (@) ANNOUNCING: The Democracy Papers Message-ID: > Growing out of a recent series of private dialogs, Yves Leclerc and I feel > we are prepared to begin publishing a series of papers, to be called "The > Democracy Papers". These will come out once a week, and will endeavor to: > > o expand list members' understanding of the meaning & potential > of democracy; encourage feedback & discusion > > o present concise but comprehensive survey of current and historical > examples of democratic societies > > o identify and develop "principles of democracy" and some > "measures" of democracy: create the tools to "objectively" compare > societies and to measure the "democratic component" of proposed > social reforms > > o discuss the life cycle of democracies -- How have they come about? > Who pushes for them? Who benefits from them? How have they decayed > or been overthrown? What are the inherent strengths and weaknesses > of democracies? > > o explore ways in which democracy can be encouraged in the real world > and on the net > > > Yves publised an essay, "Dead-End Democracy", analyzing representative > democracy, and its exportability to non-Western societies. He's now working > on "My First book of Infocracy", exploring the democratic potential of an > Information Society. > I've been developing some ideas on the subject for several years. We both > are experienced writers and intend that our "Papers" will be clearly > written, concise, informative, and interesting. Each paper will be between > one and three pages in length. The papers will be sequenced so as to > develop terminology, establish reference scenarios, and incrementally > expand our shared awareness of what democracy is, at its core, and how we > all might nurture it in the world around us. > > We see our papers as a "syndicated column" that will run regularly over > several lists. We won't have a list of our own, and no one needs to > subscribe or unsubscribe. We hope you will consider carrying these papers > over your list as a regular "feature". We'd like to forward you the first > few papers, as they come out, for your consideration. > Thanks for your attention, and we'd welcome your feedback on this project. > > In solidarity, > > Yves Leclerc (Canada) > Richard Moore (Ireland, American) ------------------------------ Date: Tue, 31 Jan 1995 15:14:41 -0800 From: rkmoore@iol.ie (Richard K. Moore) (by way of marsha-w@uiuc.edu (Marsha-W)) To: cpsr-glob Subject: re Rights Campaign (@) Message-ID: re: Seriously, we might have as much impact by picketing PFF, or Gingrich, or Rupert Murdoch, as we would by a long net.campaign. Richard Moore writes: You are correct. We need a campaign, not a paper. An appropriate "Declaration of Rights" is not a goal -- it is a necessary focusing vehicle. There's the on-net campaign and the in-world campaign. The on-net campaign benefits from: o natural common cause o familiarity with the central issue: -- the democratic potential of cyberspace o rapid communications We need to advance the on-net campaign rapidly to the following state: o essential consensus on primary agenda o sufficent activists to enable next step o effective "Declaration" document (Effective progress toward reaching this state has already been made. Not all is yet visible, but is percolating as we speak.) When this state is achieved, we will have the tools to launch the in-world campaign. Our potential in-world constituency can be characterized by: o ignorance of net culture -- "What's a virtual community?" o slower communication cycle times o globally dispersed o natural common cause with us -- once they understand what we're about Because of net-ignorance, the preamble of a public Rights Declaration will include a capsule primer on what net culture is about, and why people-managed virtual communities are beneficial to the democratic process. That phrase "globally dispersed" is of central significance. This is a global campaign, not a USA campaign. Our net makes a global campaign only incrementally more challenging than a national campaign. And there is a favorable climate for a "people's agenda" in many parts of the world (especially in the West). Indeed the grinch-infested USA presents the least hospitable climate, has the most highly organized opposition, and offers the smallest prospects for success. _______ Consider all the progressive movements in the world, many of which have connections to progressive policy officials in various governments. Consider how many of those movements have a leader or member who also is on-net. Consider how rapidly we could get a Declaration (together with some evidence of widespread net endorsement) onto the desks of those movements. The net provides an excellent coordination infrasture from which to manage the in-world campaign. We can do much better than "picketing PFF". _______ Don't let the grinch steal cyberspace. _____________________ Richard Kelly Moore citizenships: USA ; cyberspace homes: Ireland ; _____________________ ------------------------------ Date: Tue, 31 Jan 1995 15:14:30 -0800 From: rkmoore@iol.ie (Richard K. Moore) (by way of marsha-w@uiuc.edu (Marsha-W)) To: cpsr-glob Subject: The pricing issue(@) Message-ID: re: The role of the government would be to ensure that these spaces exist, through some regulation of cost and bandwidth. But the technological activity would rest with the large companies... Thanks, Andy for the clearest statement I've yet seen of the core "rights" needed by cyber citizens, in order to insure a place for our net culture in the world of Cyberspace Inc. But, alas, Andy also brings up the strongest force against achieving those rights: "some regulation of cost and bandwidth". The difficulty with such regulation can be found in the numbers. Let's look at the pricing issues from the point of view of the RBOCs: ... The problem that they see, is that there's not a great deal of profit to be made -- the whole system is really too efficient and too easy to build! I have a friend who's a VP (on the R&D side) in one the RBOCs, in fact he's probably involved in all this now. When I worked with him about 4 years ago they were just getting started in figuring out the technology and market regarding media-intensive communications. He said the big problem, as they saw it, is how do you price it? If you assume a pricing model based somewhere along the lines of (bytes X distance X recipients), then you have the following dilemma: if the price of a voice phone call or text message between two parties is 10 cents, then the price of a movie to one recipient would be thousands of dollars! On the other hand, if you charge five dollars for the movie, then phone calls and text messages would be milli-cents, or essentially free! So they see a need to redefine pricing along the lines of perceived value: a phone call would be, say, 1/10 of a movie. But once you need to push for non-cost based pricing, you're already totally wrenching the competitive market model. So their desire for a profitable model pushes them to ask for a non-competitive arena, or a monopoly. And once they go for a monopoly, in today's political climate, they might as well demand non-regulation at the same time. So the current RBOC/Newt position has nothing at all to do with any societal need for a construction or maintenance paradigm for an NII -- there really isn't any problem to be solved. It will almost happen by itself. Their position has only to do with the desire to guarantee high profitability in a market which, if left to market forces, would be extremely low cost. -rkm _____________________ Richard Kelly Moore citizenships: USA ; cyberspace homes: Ireland ; ------------------------------ Date: Tue, 31 Jan 1995 15:54:04 -0800 From: rkmoore@iol.ie (Richard K. Moore) (by way of marsha-w@uiuc.edu (Marsha-W)) To: cpsr-glob Subject: re: pricing issue Message-ID: re: I wonder if the problem could be solved by charging a small amount for the initial connection and then letting local phone calls and email be free (that would save on the costs of monitoring usage). Would movies be delivered long-distance? Or we could leave things as they are and let market forces solve the pricing problem. We'd see innovative new communications services offered at competitive prices. What a frightening prospect -- I know, not "politically realistic". re: "societal need"? "Societal need" is the rubric under which the grinch campaign is proceeding -- "America Needs Her Cyberspace!" re: What "problem" are you saying doesn't exist? The one the NII proposes to address, the one driven by America's presumed emergency need for a manhattan-project communications gold rush. Gore was wrong, and the grinch is taking over the joyride. We don't have such a need. British Telecom is already delivering home vide over phone lines. Communications-vendors are welcome to begin offering new services. Interoperability standards can be negotiated. Let the cables and the telcos compete. It's our turn to stand up for the free market system! Richard K Moore > cyber scribe < citizenships: USA ; cyberspace homes: Ireland ; ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 1 Feb 1995 11:13:49 +0530 (GMT+05:30) From: Arun Mehta To: "Richard K. Moore" Cc: cpsr-activists @ cpsr.org , gii-doc @ cpsr.org , cpsr-glob, Subject: Re: Rights Campaign Message-ID: What are the goals we would be pursuing? -nobody controls the net, i.e. no censorship other than what a defined group decides democratically for itself -low cost access, as global as possible people might want to add to the list, but I think the fewer the goals the stronger our focus. How would you feel about the following approach, which would bypass legislative and bureaucratic tangles (give the politicians and bureaucrats a chance, and they will debate these issues till kingdom come - meanwhile, we could simply hijack the issue):: An independent body incorporated somewhere safe (like a tax haven) contracts with satellite owners to buy off-peak time on transponders - which should be available for a song (some might even give it free for the publicity, or to encourage receiving dishes to point towards them) - and broadcast Usenet unencrypted. Perhaps the same could be done with digital radio. * Lots of hosts would love it, because it would cut down their costs, and free other bandwidth for the really urgent stuff. * Everyone, even in remote places, would be saved the cost of dial-up costs for receiving, which is what most of the time is spent on anyway. Even if they have to make long-distance calls to send, it still would not come to more than a few minutes a day for a fairly heavy net user. * Governments are pretty much resigned to not being able to control or censor radio and satellite broadcasts - if the same stuff is available via broadcast as on terrestrial links, maybe they'll leave the latter alone as well. * Ultimately our best defense against anyone taking over the Internet is to have as large a number of people as possible on it, who benefit from low-cost access, not just the corporate types for whom cost is secondary. Providing free receive access will encourage more people to find a way to send as well, and they will. * In this category, I would particularly want to see lots of non-governmental organisations that work for the environment, human rights, etc. who all desperately need communications (perhaps funding agencies could be animated to help them buy the necessary hardware). These people have a lot more experience in fighting for their rights than cyber-activists do, because they have been fighting governments a lot longer than we have. Once they all have a vested interest in a free Internet - and they will once they see the benefits for their cause - the battle would be won. * I think this might help tie BBSes in closer with the Internet. I think BBSes have a major role to play in spreading the Internet, because they are geared towards providing all the hand-holding that new users need. If they start to provide the Usenet stuff on their BBSes, it should encourage people to join BBSes: that way, they would not need satellite or radio modems themselves. Someone said that not enough attention was being paid to the ramps leading onto the GII; well, BBSes might play that role. * I suppose the only problem right now is the high cost of radio and satellite modems. But won't their prices go down once demand picks up? * Arun Mehta Managing Director, Indata, B-69, Lajpat Nagar, New Delhi-24. Tel: +91-11-6841172 or 6849103. Fax +91-11-4635785. amehta@doe.ernet.in ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 1 Feb 1995 05:45:56 -0800 (PST) From: Charles Bell To: Arun Mehta Cc: "Richard K. Moore" , cpsr-activists @ cpsr.org , Subject: Re: Rights Campaign Message-ID: On Wed, 1 Feb 1995, Arun Mehta wrote: > > An independent body incorporated somewhere safe (like a tax haven) > contracts with satellite owners to buy off-peak time on transponders - > which should be available for a song (some might even give it free for > the publicity, or to encourage receiving dishes to point towards them) - > and broadcast Usenet unencrypted. Perhaps the same could be done with > digital radio. > > > * Ultimately our best defense against anyone taking over the Internet is > to have as large a number of people as possible on it, who benefit from > low-cost access, not just the corporate types for whom cost is secondary. > Providing free receive access will encourage more people to find a way to > send as well, and they will. > RIGHT ON! Can we get any figures on what this would cost? Can we get any names of suitable havens? Can we set up a board of directors for this corporation? Arun and Richard can rotate as chair. Do it! Charles Bell ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 1 Feb 1995 08:42:47 -0600 From: Charles Bell (by way of marsha-w@uiuc.edu (Marsha-W)) To: cpsr-glob Subject: Re (@) Rights Campaign Message-ID: Sender: Charles Bell The `outside world' is hearing a lot about the Net right now. What it's hearing is that it is a playground for `hackers' and crackers, stalkers and porno-peddlers slavering to corrupt our children -- and that it censors earnest entrepreneurs (Cantor & Siegel) who wish to offer their wares on the marketplace. It is hearing that the Net needs new rules -- rules to rein in the evildoers and better enable it to fulfil its true and highest mission: selling. We can be sure that those rules are being drafted right now in closed chambers of our `newly open' Congress. The time to counteract this propaganda is now. The way to counteract it is for individuals to act in their own communities -- to explain what the Net is, what it can enable people to do for themselves, and why it should be left free to do it. Local and regional newspapers will print well-thought-out letters to the editor on subjects relating to the Net. (Take some scare story as a news peg and reply.) Some of them may print OpEd pieces as well. Local talk shows (radio, public access TV) may be happy to invite `experts' to discuss the Net. (Who's an expert? You are!) We don't have to wait for a fully worked-out declaration of principles. We don't even have to agree with each other on every detail of what we would like to see. We can start to educate the public while we are still learning ourselves. Richard: have you tried making yourself available to outlets in Ireland? After all ... who in your neighborhood is more expert than you? Charles Bell ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 1 Feb 1995 16:36:54 +0000 From: rkmoore@iol.ie (Richard K. Moore) To: cpsr-glob Subject: MICROSOFT TESTER DIES TRAGICALLY AT HANDS OF "PAL" (fwd) Message-ID: <199502011639.QAA15846@GPO.iol.ie> *************************************************************************** * SNAIL ME + GABRIELLI'S *SYRIAH* (RED) & * * YER ROSEHIPS + * * IF YOU LIKED THIS POST! + *ASCENZA* (WHITE-BLEND)---YUMMY! * *************************************************************************** (Better Living Thru Better Living) ---------- Forwarded message ---------- Date: Wed, 1 Feb 1995 09:07:26 -0500 From: Keith Bostic To: /dev/null@python.bostic.com Subject: MICROSOFT TESTER DIES TRAGICALLY AT HANDS OF "PAL" Forwarded-by: Peter Langston Forwarded-by: larryy@apple.com (Larry Yaeger) MICROSOFT TESTER DIES TRAGICALLY AT HANDS OF "PAL" REDMOND, Wa - The Microsoft Redmond Campus was rocked by tragedy today as Paul Fitzgerald, Test Engineer on the Windows NT Team, was brutally murdered in an apparently psychotic tirade by one of the "personalities" of Microsoft's latest operating system shell program, Bob. In the small hours of this morning, Java, the "friendly" coffee-drinking dinosaur, burst from the screen of Fitzgerald's computer, cutting a swath of destruction throughout the hapless worker's office and into the accompanying hallway. The beast was quickly subdued by Microsoft Campus Security upon failing to produce a valid Microsoft keycard, avoiding what could otherwise have been a tragedy of much greater proportions. He is currently undergoing psychiatric evaluation at the Washington Institute for Perfectly Valid Lifeforms Who in the Heat of the Moment Do Some Absolutely Naughty Things. Says Lars Opstad, chief spiritual healer and concert pianist, "It's touch and go right now. I don't think Java yet realizes the immensity of what he's done." Eyewitnesses say that they could hear the stegosaur-like computer guide screaming "All I wanted was a GOOD espresso" in those terrible moments before dawn. Said Rover Retriever, another Bob personality, "This is just terrible. Java was always such a great guy. Sure, he was a little high strung, but I can't believe he would do something like this. I think we need to seriously re-examine the stress that the Bob Personality group is under so that another such incident doesn't occur." A possible precipitant to the incident could be Java's recent attempt to quit smoking as a result of a clause in his contract. Lawyers are examining whether this constitutes a violation of discriminatory hiring statutes on Microsoft's part. Microsoft Legal could not be reached for comment, but an undisclosed source asserted "We couldn't have him puffing away like that. He's a dinosaur, not a dragon. It would confuse the market." Coroner's reports say Fitzgerald died instantly of cardiac arrest, but are unclear on whether this was a result of the vicious attack or the fact that Bob installed successfully on NT. -rkm _____________________ Richard K Moore > cyber scribe < citizenships: USA ; cyberspace homes: Ireland ; _____________________ ------------------------------ Date: Thu, 2 Feb 1995 14:33:12 +0000 From: rkmoore@iol.ie (Richard K. Moore) To: cpsr-glob Cc: cyberjourn Subject: Joke (fwd) Message-ID: <199502021436.OAA31446@GPO.iol.ie> *************************************************************************** * SNAIL ME + GABRIELLI'S *SYRIAH* (RED) & * * YER ROSEHIPS + * * IF YOU LIKED THIS POST! + *ASCENZA* (WHITE-BLEND)---YUMMY! * *************************************************************************** (Better Living Thru Better Living) ---------- Forwarded message ---------- Date: Wed, 1 Feb 1995 18:34:26 -0800 (PST) From: Andy F. D'Ambruoso To: Jokes/Fun Stuff Mailing List <6448590@lmsc5.is.lmsc.lockheed.com>, dennis.compton@spectrum.us.com, ed@mpl.ucsd.edu, fbarling@collabra.com, queens-list@netcom.com, sblish@collabra.com, zamster@eworld.com Subject: Joke Q: How do you know if a Chinese person robbed your house? A: Your cat's gone and your homework's done! Q: What's the best way to stop the stork from coming? A: Shoot in the air. Q: Why do priest masturbate? A: Because God helps those who help themselves! -Andy afd@netcom.com ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- "Ok, I wrote my name on the screen with a Magic Marker. Now how in the hell do I save that into my .signature file?!?" ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- -rkm _____________________ Richard K Moore > cyber scribe < citizenships: USA ; cyberspace homes: Ireland ; _____________________ ------------------------------ Date: Thu, 2 Feb 1995 12:30:51 -0600 From: Devron Moziek (by way of marsha-w@uiuc.edu (Marsha-W)) To: cpsr-glob Subject: Resources on the Web (@) Message-ID: Title: American Communication Association WWW Primary URL: http://cavern.uark.edu/comminfo/www/ACA.html Location of resource: University of Arkansas City: Fayetteville State: AR Country: US Contact person: Name:Devron Moziek Email:comminfo@cavern.uark.edu Description: The American Communication Association is the national professional organization of scholars, students, and practitioners in the field of communication studies. This site provides information about the ACA, a collection of materials on communication law and First Amendment issues, resources for teaching and research in communication studies, and an extensive reference resource page for scholars and activists. ------------------------------ Date: Thu, 2 Feb 1995 15:09:47 -0600 From: marsha-w@uiuc.edu (Marsha-W) To: cpsr-glob Subject: haves and havenots--a repost (@) Message-ID: I am passing this on from the list commlaw--Marsha re: but it is by no means impossible for someone living in West Virginia to > know about, and even understand, what the infobahn is (to the extent that > anyone understands what it is). Rita_Lauria@unc.edu wrote: I have to disagree here. After living in the South Pacific for two years on the island of Pohnpei in Micronesia, (probably one of the remotest places on this planet), my family and I returned to the U.S. to find a totally different world. But I had no idea what this information world was until returning to school. Sure I read about the info highway and all in the paper. But when it came time to travel that road, even as an educated individual pursuing a doctoral degree, it was out of my league. Not to mention that perhaps four fifths of the world's population are lucky if they have a telephone at their disposal. There's a lot of promise in these new technologies, but it will take supreme vigiliance and courage to first of all admit that at this point in time, these are the technologies of the elite. Not only because of financial reasons, but also because the technology is difficult to learn if one wants to utilize it to its maximum potential, not just engage in browsing the web. I don't find Unix a particularly friendly environment, and rudimentary knowledge in this sphere is essential to cruising the planet via the information infrastructure. And I consider myself educated and graced with the living standard of a middle class American who has access. There has always been the haves and the have-nots. Acknowledge your elite position by acknowledging this simple fact. The utopian dream of cyberspace realites is to allow a liberating space where we can strive to bridge this gap with inventive means, or maybe just pure luck. The point is to keep trying. Rita_Lauria@unc.edu Marsha Woodbury marsha-w@uiuc.edu U of Illinois/Urbana-Champaign FAX 217-356-7050 Home 217-337-0001 Work 217-244-3390 http://www.cpsr.org/global.html USENET: comp.org.cpsr.talk ------------------------------ Date: Thu, 2 Feb 1995 18:42:19 -0600 From: marsha-w@uiuc.edu (Marsha-W) To: cpsr-glob Subject: Some Critical Computer Science Groups (fwd) 1/2(@) Message-ID: From: fiff@fiff.gun.de >> Subject: Questionnaire >> To: >> >> Dear colleagues, >> >> some months ago we tried to compile informations on the organisations >> we cooperate with and asked You to answer some questions about Yourself. >> We promised to send You the answers of all groups. Here these answers >> are. We hope, it is not too late. >> >> We translated the incoming answers or compiled them from materials >> sent to us. We then re-translated them to English for Your use. You >> may use them freely as You wish, as long as You provide us with a copy >> of the newsletter You chose to publish these answers in. >> Ute Bernhardt, Ingo Ruhmann: >> Some Critical Computer Science Groups all Over the World >> >> Austria: >> 1. ARGE Daten - Oesterreichische Gesellschaft fuer den Datenschutz" >> is an independent consolidation of computer specialists, >> practitioners and social scientists, working on the social impacts >> of computer use. Annexed to this non-profit organisation is a >> company overseeing various projects in data-processing and >> service. The goal of ARGE DATEN is to look beyond the blinders of >> technical applications, to take serious the insecurity and >> considerations of the people and to work out the relevant >> problems. >> >> The number of members, subscribers and supporters are about 700, >> the number of people working in projects vary from 8 to 10 >> persons. >> >> 2. ARGE DATEN exists since 1983 as an informal working group, as >> an official non-profit-organisation since 1990. >> >> 3. We have published several reports and statements on the insane >> collection of data f.x. in the Austrian social services and also a >> handbook on data privacy. An important disclosure was the affair >> on the Austrian State Police and its modus operandi in 1991. >> >> 4. For the time being, there are projects to study the following >> Themes: >> >> - privacy and internal security, >> - transparency of public service, on the example of information >> processing in Austrian communities, >> - information systems in financial services (banks, securities, >> encashment-bureaus, credit-information-agencies), >> - privacy and freedom of information on ecological data, >> - consumer data and privacy. >> >> 5. ARGE works on projects, publishes a newsletter - such as the >> "Datenschutz und Informationsrecht" (privacy and information law) >> - and serves to answer all kinds of questions on information law. >> It offers courses on information design (data bank design, >> software design, man-machine-communication and privacy law), gives >> expert evidence on privacy matters, helps with the enactment >> enquiry- insight- and information-rights, checks existing dp- >> systems on their conformity with privacy laws and councisl on the >> design of scientific databases. >> >> >> Kontakt: Arge Daten >> Sautergasse 20 A-1170 Wien Austria >> Tel.: ++43-1-4897893-0, Fax: ++43-1-4897893-10 >> ----------------------------------------------------------------- >> eCE >> > Who are You and how many people do You represent? >> >> The acronym eCE stands for "engagierte Computer" ExpertInnen >> (engaged compter experts). eCE is a network of scientists and >> experts with an education or with practical experience that >> examine and assess the use of information technology in various >> areas of society. eCE works towards an improvement of the quality >> of human life and the development of computers according to human >> needs. We understand our work as a political activity. >> >> eCE has about 70 members for the moment, the active kernel consits >> of 10-15 people with an upward trend. >> >> > What was the reason, Your organisation was founded for and for >> > how long have You been working? >> >> eCE exists since 1986; FIFF and cpsr served as models. >> >> > What were the topics Your organisation has worked on? >> >> Until 1991 we worked intensively on census problems. In 1991 and >> 1992 we worked mainly on privacy in the EU, the Schengen >> agreement, european information systems, and MedCards. >> >> > What are You currently working on? >> >> We currently work on: >> - international networking, internal security, >> - hospital information systems, MedCard, new accounting systems >> coming along with new technologies, >> - networks and democracy, cryptography and the interests of >> governments and the intelligence community, >> - new technologies in production, consequences for unions, >> >> > How do You work: do You publish materials, organise workshops or >> > congresses, work as a political lobby group etc.? >> >> we >> - publish our results as short and concise press-statements to >> journalistst (mostly in Austria, but also in Germany and >> Switzland) and members. If there is any further demand, we give >> background information and make meetings if wished; >> - cooperate with various - also international - groups such as >> ARGE Daten or ARGE Kritische Pflege on hospital information >> systems. If there are common interests, studies are made on >> demand; >> - hold workshops once a year to work intensively on two topics. We >> try to win experts, who see things differently than we do, for >> example non-technical people; >> - give our members further information; >> - hold contact with other groups. cpsr Berkley or LaborNet both >> have a considerable interest in labor regulations here in Europe, >> the situation of the unions and the situation in the high-tech- >> market here. >> >> contact: >> eCE, Postfach 168, A-1015 Wien, Austria >> email: Kurt.Fuchs@aaf.alcatel.at >> >> ----------------------------------------------------------------- >> USA: cpsr >> > Who are You and how many people do You represent? >> >> "Computer professionals for social responsibility" was founded in >> 1982 as a reaction on the orientation of computer science into a >> technology for the battlefield and especially against president >> Reagans Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI). >> >> cpsr today has 22 local chapters in the US. On the board of >> advisers are four winners of the Turing award and one Noble Price >> winner. >> >> > What was the reason, Your organisation was founded for and for >> > how long have You been working? >> > What were the topics Your organisation has worked on? >> >> cpsr warned vehemently - notably before the U.S. Senate - about >> the dangers in the use of computers for the control of the SDI- >> system as well as many other research and development programs >> aimed at the automation of the battlefield. >> >> Further areas we have been working on are: privacy, computers in >> the workplace, technology policy and human needs, reliability of >> computer systems and their risks. >> >> > What are You currently working on? >> >> With the end of the Bush administration the cpsr began the 21st >> century project, an initiative for the human-oriented research and >> development of computer technology. In the beginning of the >> Clinton administration, cpsr was invited to hearings on the future >> U.S. technology policy. >> >> Our main work today is in the socially acceptable development >> of the information infrastructure, democracy in the electronic age >> and an initiative against the Clipper chip. There are a number of >> other projects going on. The central office in Palo Alto >> coordinates the national activities and cooperates internationally >> with various groups. >> >> > How do You work: do You publish materials, organise workshops or >> > congresses, work as a political lobby group etc.? >> >> The cpsr has orgenized quite a number of conferences and expert >> meetings, amongst them the renowned "Directions and Implications >> of Advanced Computing (DIAC)". Since 1987 we have awarded the >> Norbert Wiener award for outstanding work and merits on the field >> of social consequences of computing. The first two people awarded >> were Jospeh Weizenbaum and David L. Parnas. >> >> cpsr has published books, documentations and has even produced a >> video. Quarterly the "cpsr Newsletter" is published. The >> electronic mailing list is converted into two internet newsgroups. >> Additionally regional groups publish their own materials via e- >> mail regularly. >> >> >> Kontakt: CPSR P.O.Box 717 Palo Alto, CA 94301 USA >> Tel: ++1-(415) 322-3778 email: cpsr @ cpsr.org >> ----------------------------------------------------------------- >> United Kingdom: SGR >> >> > Who are You and how many people do You represent? >> >> Scientists for Global Responsibility is an independent >> organisation of scientists and other related professions. It was >> founded in answer to the irresponsible use of science and >> technology for the continued development of weapons of mass >> destruction as well as the damaging effects on the environment. >> SGR today has 1000 members. >> >> > What was the reason, Your organisation was founded for and for >> how long have You been working? >> >> SGR was founded in 1992. The founding organisation were >> Electronics and Computing for Peace (ECP), Psychologists for Peace >> (PfP) and Scientist against Nuclear Arms (SANA), which in turn >> were founded 1981 and 1982. SGR works on the role of science in >> society and ethical problems. It wants to develop means of a >> socially acceptable science in a democratic society. >> >> > What were the topics Your organisation has worked on? >> >> Some of our recent issues are: civil defence, nuclear winter, >> nuclear war by accident, nuclear waepons (cruise, Trident), SDI >> and others. >> >> > What are You currently working on? >> >> Our main work is by now devoted to a science and ethics- >> initiative. In it, ethical problems shall be brought to the >> attention of scientists and engineers for whom a network of >> mentors and counsilors for ethical questions shall be developed. >> At universities, SGR initiates the founding of ehtical committees, >> to consider ethical questions in science. In UK's science policy, >> SGR works on socially and ethically acceptable visions for >> science. A project on the effects of electromagnetic fields is in >> preparation. >> >> > How do You work: do You publish materials, organise workshops or >> congresses, work as a political lobby group etc.? >> >> SGR publishes a newsletter and publications, most of which tackle >> problems with nuclear arms. Conferences are also being arranged. >> The last one 1993 was in London and had the title "Science: Ethics >> and Dilemmas". >> >> Kontakt: SGR Unit 3, Down House >> The Business Village Broomhill Road >> London SW18 4JQ UK >> Tel.: ++44-081-871-5175 email: sgr@gn.apc.org >> ----------------------------------------------------------------- >> >> Spain: CLI >> >> > Who are You and how many people do You represent? >> >> CLI (Comision de Libertades e Informatica - Commission for >> Liberties and Informatics) is a broad coalition of organizations >> concerned about misuse of Information Technologies against >> citizens' rights, mainly privacy rights, in Spain. As of today the >> joint membership of the entities making part of CLI is about 3 >> million people. >> >> > What was the reason, Your organisation was founded for and for >> > how long have You been working? >> >> The main reason for the creation of CLI was the lack of >> legislation about computerized personal data in Spain at the >> moment (November 1991) when representatives of several >> organizations first met at the initiative of ATI (Asociacion de >> Tecnicos de Informatica). >> >> >> > What were the topics Your organisation has worked on? >> >> The main focus of CLI till recently has been the Spanish Law on >> Computerized Personal Data. >> >> > What are You currently working on? >> >> We still monitor over the implementation of the above Law, mainly >> on the creation of the Data Protection Agency, but we are starting >> other lines of action such as promotion of regional Data >> Protection Agencies (similar to the ones in the German Lander), >> privacy in communications, surveillance, etc. Last but not least, >> we'd like to establish permanent links with European organizations >> with equivalent aims, similar to the ones we currently have with >> CPSR and Privacy International. >> >> > How do You work: do You publish materials, organise workshops or >> > congresses, work as a political lobby group etc.? >> >> We do a little bit of everything but dedicate our biggest efforts >> to the spread of awareness and conciousness amomg the public about >> the need to protect people's constitutional rights in an >> increasingly computerized environment. >> >> Kontakt: >> CLI (Comision de Libertades e Informatica - >> Commission for Liberties and Informatics) >> Padilla 66, 3 dcha.>> E-28006 Madrid Spain >> Tel.: xx34-402-9391>> email: rfcalvo@guest2.atimdr.es >> >> ----------------------------------------------------------------- >> Switzerland: SI >> >> > Who are You and how many people do You represent? >> >> We are the group "Informatik und Gesellschaft" (Computers and >> Society) of the Suiss InformatikerInnen Gesellschaft (SI). Our >> group has 96 members from all over Switzerland for the moment. >> Howerver, with the SI-Journal we can reach about 3500 members of >> SI. >> >> > What was the reason, Your organisation was founded for and for >> how long have You been working? >> >> Our gruoup was founded on Feb 7. 1992 on the initiative of a >> group of critical computer scientists from the universities Zurich >> and Bern. >> >> > What were the topics Your organisation has worked on? >> >> With a congress we strengthened the cooperation between computer >> and social scientist, and work on problems of computer science and >> the Third World. We also worked out an official statement on >> technology assessment. >> >> > What are You currently working on? >> >> We compile the results of the congress and intensify our >> collaboration with the Swiss sociological society. We also try to >> influence the technology assessment part of the Swiss Research >> Program. There is a cooperation with the COMETT-educational group >> CONTEC that promotes educational programs on our theme. >> >> > How do You work: do You publish materials, organise workshops or >> congresses, work as a political lobby group etc.? >> >> Some of the results of congresses or meetings we organised were >> published as books. Our members presented their TA-projects in >> working groups. All activities are coordinated in meetings of our > Marsha Woodbury marsha-w@uiuc.edu U of Illinois/Urbana-Champaign FAX 217-356-7050 Home 217-337-0001 Work 217-244-3390 http://www.cpsr.org/global.html USENET: comp.org.cpsr.talk ------------------------------ Date: Thu, 2 Feb 1995 18:44:10 -0600 From: marsha-w@uiuc.edu (Marsha-W) To: cpsr-glob Subject: Some Critical Computer Science Groups (fwd)2/2 (@) Message-ID: >> board. >> Kontakt: >> Schweizer InformatikerInnen Gesellschaft (SI) >> Fachgruppe "I & G" >> Schwandenholzstr. 286 >> CH-8046 Zurich Switzerland >> Tel.: ++41 (0)13717342 >> email: aBuergi@eurocor.unibe.ch >> G0rSchultz@sgcl1.unisg.ch >> >> ----------------------------------------------------------------- >> France: creis >> >> > Who are You and how many people do You represent? >> > What was the reason, Your organisation was founded for and for >> how long have You been working? >> >> CREIS (Centre de coordination pour la Recherche et l'Enseignement >> en Informatique et Societ) is a nonprofit organisation and was >> founded in 1984. Its purpose is to do research work, publish >> results and support ideas in computers and society. CREIS is >> mainly made up of scientists, teachers of different branches and >> practically oriented people of different backgrounds. CREIS now >> has 70 members. The educational goals of CREIS are to educate >> students to use computers in a socially acceptable manner. The >> integration of ergonomics, organisational techniques, >> communication techniques, laws, and problems of joblessness as >> well as any kind of consideration to solve problems caused by >> computer use are given high priority. >> >> >> > What were the topics Your organisation has worked on? >> >> CREIS scientist have published numerous books and articles on the >> following issues: >> - informatics and freedom, >> - human-computer-interaction and ergonomics, >> - preconditions to social acceptance of automated systems, >> - social consequences of telematics systems, >> - computer aided education, >> - history and epistemology of informatics, >> - computers and the financial system, >> - computers and the Third World. >> >> > What are You currently working on? >> >> CREIS is preparing a conference on "identity and responsibilty of >> computer scientists" in 1995 in Namur, Belgium. Under preparation >> also is a thesaurus and dictionary on computers and society. >> >> >> > How do You work: do You publish materials, organise workshops or >> congresses, work as a political lobby group etc.? >> >> CREIS has a documentation center (see address) on computers and >> society. It publishes a newsletter twice annually and other >> materials. Since 1979 there have been symposias almost yearly, the >> last in Paris on "Chances and risks of computerizing the Europe of >> tomorrow". >> >> Kontakt: >> Flix Paoletti/CREIS >> Dpartment d'Informatique >> Universit Paris VI >> Tour 55-65 Bureau 309 >> 4, Place Jussieu >> F 75252 Paris Cedex 05 France >> Tel.: ++33 (1) 44275877 >> email: fpao@ccr.jussieu.fr >> >> ----------------------------------------------------------------- >> Finland: ty >> >> > Who are You and how many people do You represent? >> >> The Finnish association Computers and Society (Tietotekniikka ja >> yhteiskunta, TY) has currently about 100 members; the chairman of >> the association is Dr. Jari Veijalainen (tel. +358-0-268138, e- >> mail Jari.Veijalainen@vtt.fi), and the secretary is Ms. Helena >> Ahonen, M.Sc. (tel.+358-0-7084218, e-mail Helena.Ahonen@helsinki.fi). >> >> > What was the reason, Your organisation was founded for and for >> > how long have You been working? >> >> The association was founded in 1985, originally under the name >> Computer Professionals for Social Peace and Social Responsibility >> (Tietojenkasittelijaiden rauhan ja yhteiskunnallisen vastuun >> yhdistys, TRYVY). The initial impetus to the organization came >> from the discussions in the early 1980's of the ethical >> responsibility of professionals, and the role of professionals in >> the peace movement. >> >> The American association CPSR provided an organizational model, >> and ideas were also obtained from the many other similar >> professional groups established at that time. Fairly soon the >> interests in the association broadened from the originating issues >> of war, technology, and peace, to cover also other aspects of >> computers in society. >> >> > What were the topics Your organisation has worked on? >> >> Over the years, we have worked on quite a number of topics. To >> name a few recent ones, we have discussed the impact of >> telecommunications and computer networks on society, the problems >> of information technology transfer to the developing countries, >> the nature of expertise in information systems development, and >> the effects of the current serious economic recession in Finland >> on the information technology profession. >> >> > What are You currently working on? >> >> Our current main focus is the strategy for information technology >> development in Finland. A high-level government committee is >> currently defining a framework for the future of information >> networks and services and Finland, the uses of IT in government >> and business, the support of IT research and development, etc. We >> follow this work, and try to exert an influence on it, to the >> extent that is necessary and possible. >> >> > How do You work: do You publish materials, organise workshops or >> > congresses, work as a political lobby group etc.? >> >> Our main function has been as providers of information: we have >> organized talks and workshops on the topics under discussion, >> published a (roughly) biannual bulletin, and provided speakers and >> other expertise for the joint projects of the professional ethical >> groups, which have quite a close cooperation in Finland. >> >> >> Contacts: >> >> Computers and Society>> c/o Helena Ahonen / Pekka Orponen >> Department of Computer Science>> P.O.Box 26 >> FIN-00014 University of Helsinki>> Finland >> >> Tel.: +358 0 708 4218 / 4224>> Fax: +358 0 708 4441 >> E-mail: Helena.Ahonen@Helsinki.FI, Pekka.Orponen@Helsinki.FI >> ----------------------------------------------------------------- >> Belgium: emerit >> >> > Who are You and how many people do You represent? >> > What was the reason, Your organisation was founded for and for >> how long have You been working? >> >> EMERIT is the acronym for "Experiment of Mediation and Evaluation >> in Research Innovation and Technology". Out of the common interest >> of companies and unions at the end of the eighties, to organise >> technolgy assessment (TA) as a social dialog, the ministry of >> technology development and work of the Walloon Region founded the >> EMERIT project in 1992 at the Fondation Travail-Universit (FTU) >> of the university Namur. EMERIT was originally planned as a two- >> year-project, but was extended until 1995. The project is run and >> coordinated by four people. >> >> > What were the topics Your organisation has worked on? >> >> One of the first missions was to arouse the consciousness for TA >> and the dialog with the various social groups involved. This was >> done by publications, seminars and conferences. The research of >> EMERIT is oriented on the needs of the Walloon Region. Special >> concepts are worked out for that. Annother issue is the assessment >> of environmental consequences. >> >> > What are You currently working on? >> >> Until the end of the project, new research projects will be >> undertaken on; work and technology, work and the environment, and >> science and society. The future work of EMERIT will orient itself >> along the context developed by the regional council for science >> policy in 1994. The main focus will be on: environmental >> technology, transportation technology, athropocentric production >> systems, new materials in industry, and communications technology. >> >> > How do You work: do You publish materials, organise workshops or >> congresses, work as a political lobby group etc.? >> >> To make the decision makers and interested social groups attentive >> to TA and to keep them informed, EMERIT publishes the newsletter >> "Lettre EMERIT". Its research results are published in the >> "Collection EMERIT", which also contain the results of meetings >> and conferences. EMERIT is also perticipating in the political >> decision process on TA and research policy as consultants. >> >> Kontakt: >> Grard Valenduc, Patricia Vendramin >> FTU-EMERIT>> Rue de l'Arsenal 5 >> B-5000 Namur Belgien>> Tel:++32-81-725122 >> Fax:++32-81-725128 >> >> ----------------------------------------------------------------- >> Netherlands: SWP >> >> > Who are You and how many people do You represent? >> > What was the reason, Your organisation was founded for and for >> > how long have You been working? >> >> We are Stichting Waakzaamheid Persoonsregistratie (SWP). The >> census in 1971, plans for a central personal register and a >> personal identification number were the reasons for the start of a >> discussion on privacy in the Netherlands. A committee Waakzaamheid >> Volkstelling was founded, from which - as a documentation and >> study center for matters of privacy - 1974 the SWP was founded. >> The public should have a place to turn to with questions on >> privacy. >> > What were the topics Your organisation has worked on? >> >> Our main work is on data protection and privacy. We worked in the >> beginning to enhance the consciousness on privacy problems and to >> inform the public on it. On this behalf, we investigated and made >> transparent the quite extensive data keeping by security forces >> and public registers, the intensive automation in the industry at >> the end of the seventies, medical registers and other problems as >> well. SWP counciled citizens and helped them in court against >> other organisations. In judicial questions, public institutions >> were also given advice. >> >> > What are You currently working on? >> >> SWP saw itself as a people's movement and had a bureau with eight >> experts working on about 250 inquiries from the public a week. The >> political climate on privacy, however has changed dramatically in >> the last years. The support for our work fell flat. Since SWP took >> and got no money for its councelling, there now was no way left to >> continue SWP in its old form. The activists now work to reorganise >> the activities and hope to reopen a bureau soon. >> >> >> > How do You work: do You publish materials, organise workshops or >> congresses, work as a political lobby group etc.? >> >> SWP published the quarterly journal "Privacy en Registratie" as >> well as a number of books and handbooks. SWP was a kind of >> ombudsman for all problems with privacy including all kinds of >> personal councelling as well as answering technical questions. >> There have been meetings, conferences, speeches and actions on >> different topics. >> >> ----------------------------------------------------------------- >> Germany: FIFF >> >> >Who are You and how many people do You represent? >> >What was the reason, Your organisation was founded for and for how >> long have You been working? >> >> We are the non-profit organisation Forum InformatikerInnen fuer Frieden und >> gesellschaftliche Verantwortung (FIFF) e.V. Organised in FIFF are >> over 900 computer professionals. FIFF was founded in 1984 to a >> large degree, because the big German DP-professionals organisation >> had qualms about a group of members arguing against a perceived >> militarisation of the computing profession via SDI, STARS and >> various other US research programs at that time, and promoting >> instead a socially acceptable approach to the development of >> computer systems. >> >> Looking to the US and the founding of cpsr, we >> saw a chance to develop our ideas freely within the FIFF instead >> of changing the way of traditional computer science organisations in >> the first place. So, FIFF grew into an organisation for every kind of >> DP professional. It is now the biggest organisation solely devoted >> to a "critical" view on computers and society in Germany. >> >> > What were the topics Your organisation has worked on? >> >> Since 1984, FIFF has worked on a very broad number of topics >> concerning computers and society, starting from the military >> history of computer science, a work-ethic for DP-people, privacy, >> computer science research and development policy, participative >> system design, computers and ecology, unto the treatment of >> electronic waste and so on. >> >> We have cooperated with cpsr from the beginning, being named as >> their German counterpart in their first Newsletters. Joseph >> Weizenbaum today is on our board of scientific advisors. With >> other European groups we have also cooperated - mainly on our >> yearly congresses and trough an exchange of publications. >> >> > What are You currently working on? >> >> Nowadays a lot has changed compared with 1984. Much of the work >> formerly seen unfit for DP-professionals to work on, now is being >> worked out in universities. However, the political clout of >> socially responsively DP-professionals has not increased and so >> the FIFF has moved a little bit more into some form of political >> lobbying. Here, we today work against the weakening of privacy >> laws - via Europe, Schengen or for domestic reasons -, inform >> the public about the use of computer networks by right-wing groups >> or the coming information highway and try to make our opinions >> being heared. >> >> > How do You work: do You publish materials, organise workshops or >> congresses, work as a political lobby group etc.? >> >> Although we now have over 900 members, we only have a small bureau >> with a staff of two part-timers. The bulk of the work - for >> example our quarterly newsletter or the books we publish - is >> being done just for the honor of it, mostly in regional chapters, >> but also by some groups working Germany-wide. Our last congress in >> october 1994 was a look back onto ten years of work in the FIFF >> and a look forward to the problems of a computerised society ten >> years from now. Our next congress in November 1995 will focus on >> the social consequences of the so-called infobahn. >> >> Since last September, the subcommittee on disarmament and arms >> control of the German Bundestag has asked the FIFF to conduct a >> six-month study on computerized warfare, its consequences on >> international security and computer science, and to find ways and >> means to identify militarily relevant computer science research >> early on. The results will be presented to the Bundestag not >> before September 1995. >> >> FIFF-Buero E-mail: fiff@fiff.gun.de FFFF I FFFF FFFF >> Tel.:xx49-228-219548 Fax: -214924 F I F F >> Forum InformatikerInnen fuer Frieden und FFFF I FFFF FFFF >> gesellschaftliche Verantwortung (FIFF) e.V. F I F F >> Reuterstr. 44, D-53113 Bonn F I F F >> computer professionals for peace and social responsibility Marsha Woodbury marsha-w@uiuc.edu U of Illinois/Urbana-Champaign FAX 217-356-7050 Home 217-337-0001 Work 217-244-3390 http://www.cpsr.org/global.html USENET: comp.org.cpsr.talk ------------------------------ End of CPSR-GLOBAL Digest 79 ****************************